800.883.3975

slogan

It's not about the wood
It's about how it's made
—and who made it

We build Laminated floors that last

MYTH:
Oak species, like Red Oaks and White Oaks, have been used longer
in the manufacture of trailer flooring because it is perceived to be the best.

BUSTED:

Most trailer floors in Europe are made of Beech or Birch species. In North America, hardwood species, such as Red Oaks, White Oaks, Maples, Beeches, Birches and Ashes, are used and all have the physical properties to withstand the demands of trailer flooring.

FACT:

Red Oaks and White Oaks are popular species for trailer flooring in North America because of their abundance in regions where certain flooring manufacturers are located. But, globally, dry van trailers have used many different hardwood species both because of their availability and their ability to withstand the physical demands of trailer flooring.

MYTH:
Because Oak species are heavier and darker than other woods,
they are believed to be the strongest hardwood available in North America
for the manufacture of trailer flooring.

BUSTED:

Actually, the stiffest and the strongest species in North America used to make trailer floors are Maple and Birch, such as Sugar Maple, Black Maple and Yellow Birch. In general, Maples, Birches and Beeches weigh less than Oaks, but Maples have tighter fiber bonds and are more rigid, making them similar or even superior in strength to Red Oaks and White Oaks. Because Sugar Maple weighs less than White Oak, for example, some mistakenly perceive it as weaker.

FACT:

There are approximately 21 different species of Oak and 13 species of Maple in North America, each varying in characteristics like strength, stiffness, hardness, color, and weight in relation to climate conditions such as temperature, moisture, humidity, and general weather.

MYTH:
Oak species are considered to be "most resistant" to decay.

BUSTED:

Laminated trailer floors can be made of Maples, Beeches, Birches, Oaks, etc. Though rare, decay can occur in any wood species and is almost always a natural process. The rear door threshold plate of a trailer is most prone to decay as a result of trapped moisture from snow or rain. In order for decay to occur, optimal conditions (30 % moisture and higher) for fungi growth must be present. The moisture content of a trailer floor will rarely exceed 20%. Consequently, the probability of reaching the minimum threshold of 30% moisture content necessary for the development of destructive fungus becomes practically zero.

FACT:

According to a publication by the U.S. Department of Agriculture titled Hardwood of North America, Maple is comparable in decay resistance to Red Oaks, which has been used for many decades to make laminated trailer flooring.


figure1_oak

Figure 1 shows a laminated oak floor with severe fungus and wood rot. An appropriate design to drain excess water and moisture and using a wood preservative, like borate, can prevent fungus from growing and reduce the risk of decay.

MYTH:
Maple is more susceptible to shrinkage than Oak or other woods.

BUSTED:

Maple species react the same as any other wood in identical conditions. But when a Prolam floor becomes wet, the patented Zig-Zag Technology used when constructing the floor works to seal the joint, so once it returns to its original size, there is no additional shrinkage.

FACT:

When placed in identical conditions, all woods will swell and shrink with the conditions, including Oaks, Maples, Birches, Ashes, etc.

MYTH:
Oak species have a higher resistance to splitting upon nailing than other woods.

BUSTED:

Maples, Birches and Beeches can withstand as much pressure from nailing as any other hardwoods.

FACT:

Any hardwood can potentially be split when nailed based on the circumstances. To avoid splitting the wood, simply use a nail with a flattened tip.

myth_nailed